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Sunday, 6 August 2017

It’s obvious that Google is interested in mapping just about everything that is mappable via Street View, but even our future overlords they need some help on occasion. Although the company is willing to send employees with trekker backpacks to many an exotic location, when it comes to taking a virtual tour of local businesses, the search giant hires on “trusted photographers.”
One such photographer recently sat down with Tested and told them all about the process of becoming a Google Business Trusted Photographer and taking Street View indoors.
Where Google’s employees have the help of a capable trekker camera backpack that does most of the work automatically, Google trusted photographers must use their own gear. In Jeremy Powlus‘ case, that means attaching an 8mm lens to his Canon 7D (only certain cameras and lenses are allowed), setting it up on his tripod, and getting to work.

Original Post from : https://petapixel.com/2013/08/30/google-business-photographer-talks-shooting-street-view-inside-businesses/

Sunday, 2 July 2017

Choosing a tripod can be an overwhelming experience, given how many different types and choices we are presented with. On one hand, a tripod is a very simple tool to keep our cameras steady when we use them in challenging light conditions. On the other hand, there are so many different variables that come into play when choosing a tripod: How tall should it be? How light should it be? How stable should it be? What kind of weight can it support? How much should I spend on a tripod? These are just some of the questions that might come up as you look into buying a new tripod.
Manfrotto Tripod
Before getting into the intricate details about tripods, I would like to go over the advantages and disadvantages of tripods and why you might need one for your DSLR.

1) Why Do You Need a Tripod?

So, what is the purpose of a tripod? You might need a tripod for some or all of the following reasons:
  1. To increase sharpness and depth of field in your images by keeping the camera still in low-light environments when using slow shutter speeds.
  2. To rest heavy camera gear such as long telephoto lenses on the tripod.
  3. To increase the quality of the images by keeping the camera ISO low.
  4. To allow more careful composition, while framing the shot exactly how you want it.
  5. To shoot HDR and panoramic shots that require exactly the same framing and precision.
  6. To photograph nighttime objects such as the Moon, planets, stars, etc. as well as painting with light or using available light for landscape and architectural photography.
  7. To do self-portraits with a camera timer.
  8. To shoot extreme close-ups/macro (flowers, insects, etc).
  9. To hold various objects such as flashes, reflectors, etc.
  10. To shoot at difficult or impossible (hand-held) angles.
  11. To shoot vibration-free videos.
  12. To defend yourself :)
I personally use a tripod for one main reason – landscape photography. Shooting sunrises and sunsets can be quite challenging, especially when the light conditions are far from ideal. Thanks to image stabilized lenses and now cameras with excellent built-in image stabilization, the use of a tripod for most types of photography is not necessary when shooting in daylight conditions. However, some photographers still prefer to use a tripod, as it allows them to keep the camera ISO as low as possible, which not only keeps the amount of noise in images to a minimum, but also provides the highest dynamic range the camera sensor can capture. In addition, a tripod can help in proper framing of a subject and allow to capture panoramic and HDR images. Lastly, there are situations where one must use a tripod in order to slow down and blur action, such as when photographing streams and waterfalls as shown in the image below. Therefore, if you are into landscape photography, a good tripod is a must-have tool in the field.
Mt Rainier NP #11
NIKON D3S + 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 32mm, ISO 200, 6/1, f/9.0
Occasionally, I might use a tripod for wildlife photography (specifically birds), but not during long hikes, due to inconvenience and weight factors.

2) Tripod Components – What is a Tripod System?

A tripod system is generally comprised of the following parts:
  1. Legs – the obvious. Tripod legs are typically made of aluminum, basalt, steel or carbon fiber.
  2. Head – the part that holds a digital camera or a lens. There are many different types of heads, but the most popular types are ball-heads and pan-tilt heads.
  3. Centerpost/Center Column – a separate leg that runs through the middle, allowing to further raise the tripod head.
  4. Feet – good tripods allow changing tripod feet at the end of the legs for indoor and outdoor use.
The cheapest tripods have legs with an integrated non-replaceable head and feet and sometimes have a centerpost, while the top-of-the-line tripods have a modular tripod system that have replaceable feet and allow attaching a separate tripod head (the head is typically not included).

3) Disadvantages of Using a Tripod

Tripods are nice and can give you many options to get the highest quality image. However, there are also some disadvantages of using tripods, specifically:
  1. They are potentially heavy. Although there are lightweight carbon-fiber tripods out there, once you add a tripod head, the setup can become heavy.
  2. They are inconvenient. No matter how small and collapsible a tripod is, it still occupies space and is often inconvenient to carry around or travel with.
  3. They are difficult to use in crowded environments.
  4. They can be expensive. Good tripod systems can cost over $1,000.
  5. They can take time to set up, making you miss the best moment.
  6. You can easily damage your camera and lens if you do not know how to properly operate a tripod, or if the tripod system is cheap and unstable.

4) Factors to Consider When Choosing a Tripod

You started your tripod shopping spree and have no idea where to start. What factors do you need to consider when purchasing a tripod? As I have pointed out above, purchasing a tripod can be an overwhelming experience, given how many different choices we are presented with from small and compact, to large and heavy. Let’s go through each factor and identify your needs:

4.1) Weight Rating

The first thing I would look at is how much weight a tripod can support. Many photographers make the mistake of buying a tripod that can only support a few pounds and is not made for heavy camera equipment. What ends up happening is the obvious – at one point or another the whole thing collapses, destroying the camera and the lens. Always make sure that the tripod you want to buy can support at least 1.5 times more than the total weight of your camera and your heaviest lens. I say at least, because I prefer to keep it at around 2x more. Do not forget that you will at times apply pressure on your camera and sometimes even rest your hands on the setup if you are shooting with long lenses, which adds to the weight. You might also add a flash or a battery grip to your camera in the future, or potentially shoot with something heavier, so you have to keep all of that in mind.

4.2) Tripod Height

I always recommend buying a tripod that matches your height, so that you do not have to bend to look into the viewfinder. Once you put your camera on a tripod, the viewfinder should be at your eye level. It is OK if it goes higher than your eye level, because you can always adjust the legs to be shorter. However, if it is much below your eye level, you will find yourself bending all the time, which can be a tiring experience, especially when you are waiting for some kind of action and need to constantly look through the viewfinder.
If you are buying a tripod with an attached head, you want the tip of the head to be on your jaw level. If you are buying a modular tripod with a separate head, make sure that the legs end approximately on your shoulder level.
Another factor to consider is tripod height when it is folded for easier travel. Do you need it to fit in your carry-on luggage? Mine barely does diagonally, with feet removed, and I take it with me everywhere I go.

4.3) Tripod Weight and Construction

Weight is a significant factor when choosing a tripod. You do not want your tripod to be too heavy, because you will find yourself leaving it at home, rather than taking it with you on the road. The lightest tripods are made of carbon-fiber material, which is extremely durable, stable and does not rust. While carbon-fiber is the best material for a tripod, it unfortunately comes at a high price tag.
The next best construction material is aluminum, which is heavier than carbon fiber. Most cheaper tripods are made of aluminum today. You can also find tripods made of stainless steel, but those are generally used for video equipment and are too heavy for regular use.
In terms of total weight, try to keep the tripod legs without the head under 5 pounds. Generally, carbon fiber legs are between 3 and 4 pounds (but can be lighter or heavier depending on what they are made for), while aluminum legs can be between 5 and 6 pounds and heavier, depending on the size and how much weight they can support. Basalt lava legs are somewhere in-between both in terms of weight and cost.
Gitzo GT5531s

4.4) Tripod Legs

Tripod legs generally come in two forms – tubular and non-tubular. All carbon-fiber legs come in tubular form and have a threaded twist-lock system to secure the legs, while aluminum, basalt and steel tripods might come in different shapes with a flip-lock. Depending on the maximum height of the tripod, there might be between 3 and 5 sections on tripod legs. The more sections, the higher the tripod and generally a little less stable.

4.5) Tripod Feet

Some advanced tripods will allow you to replace tripod feet for different conditions and situations – they just unscrew on the bottom of the tripod legs. There are different types of tripod feet for indoors (rubber or plastic) and outdoors use (metal spikes). Unless you are planning to shoot in icy, rainy/slippery conditions, the standard rubber feet that come with your tripod should work just fine.
Gitzo Tripod Feet

4.6) Centerpost

Some tripods come with a centerpost – a single leg in the middle of the tripod that allows you to increase or decrease the height of the camera by simply moving the centerpost in upward or downward direction. Although some photographers find it convenient and nice to have, I strongly advice against having a centerpost on a tripod. A centerpost defeats the whole purpose of a tripod – it is essentially the same thing as having a monopod on top of a tripod. It might not be as pronounced if you are only shooting with a wide-angle lens, but once you set up a long telephoto lens, you will quickly understand that using a centerpost will cause too much vibration. If you still want to get a centerpost for whatever reason, make sure that it can fully decline to the same level as where the tripod legs meet. The centerpost should never wobble at its lowest level.
Manfrotto Carbon Fiber Legs with Center Column

4.7) Tripod Head

A tripod head is the most essential part of the tripod system. It is responsible for securely holding camera equipment and controlling camera movement. A modular tripod system does not come with a head and you have to buy it separately. When choosing a tripod head, always make sure that it can support at least the same amount of weight your tripod legs can.
Benro Pan-Tilt Head
There are three types of heads commonly available:
  1. Pan-Tilt Head – either with a single handle for horizontal movement or dual handles for both horizontal and vertical movement. This is the most common type of head that is typically built into cheaper tripods.
  2. Ball-Head – compared to pan-tilt heads, ball-heads only have one control that loosens or tightens the grip. They are very flexible and allow very smooth operation while keeping the camera/lens securely tightened.
  3. Gimbal Head – a specialized head for long and heavy 300mm+ lenses. Compared to pan-tilt heads and ball-heads, gimbal heads perfectly balance the camera and heavy lens and are best suited for fast-action photography. They are extremely easy to use in any direction and do not require tightening the head every time the camera/lens moves.
I started out with a pan-tilt head and eventually switched over to a ball-head with a quick-release system (see next), due to flexibility and easiness of use.

4.8) Quick-Release System

Every modern camera comes with a thread on its bottom that allows you to attach it to a tripod or a monopod (heavy lenses also come with a similar thread on the tripod collar). This threaded system makes it extremely inconvenient to attach cameras and lenses on tripods, because you have to either rotate the camera or the tripod to attach them together. To make it easier and more convenient for photographers, manufacturers came up with a great solution – to attach a small removable plate on the camera or lens, which then can be tightly secured on the tripod head.

Cheaper tripods come with a simple plastic plate that can be attached on any camera or lens, while some of the more expensive tripod heads come with a more durable plate. The best quick-release system, however, is the Arca-Swiss Quick Release System. It has more or less become a standard among manufacturers and it has proven to be a very effective solution for quick and easy operation. Compared to plastic plates, the Arca-Swiss Quick Release System is made of very strong aluminum and allows attaching the camera/lens on a tripod without the need to rotate anything. A quick-release plate is permanently attached to a camera or lens, which then easily slides into a quick-release clamp (pictured below). The locking mechanism is simple, yet super tight for a vibration-free operation.
Arca Swiss Z1 with Plate
The beauty of this system is that some manufacturers like Really Right Stuff and Kirk Enterprises offer not only plates for almost any camera and lens, but also replacement lens tripod collars, flash brackets, L-brackets and other accessories for the Arca-Swiss Quick Release System. The only downside of the Arca-Swiss Quick Release System is that it is not cheap – you also have to purchase separate plates for each camera and lens.

4.9) Stability

A heavy tripod does not always mean that it is stable. There are plenty of tripod systems out there that are heavy and durable, yet lack the much-needed stability when used in various weather conditions. When a tripod is fully set up, it has to withstand not only wind, but also occasional bumps and knocks that might happen in the field. You always need to make sure that your camera and lens balance on a tripod rather than lean towards one direction, because you might end up damaging your equipment if the head is not fully tightened or if the front outweighs the back and everything falls on the ground.

5) Which Tripod Should you Buy?

Now that you are familiar with all the criteria for selecting the right tripod, you are probably wondering which tripod you should buy for your photography needs. Since I have numerously gone through the experience of shopping for tripods and have seen others do the same, let me tell you what many photographers end up doing. They first look for the cheapest tripod available that will be good enough to hold their first camera, since they have no idea if they really need it or do not know how often they would be using it. The tripod would cost between $75 and $150 for the legs and the head, which is a good price for a simple tool. Next, they purchase a longer and heavier lens and add more weight to the setup. All of a sudden, they find that the cheap tripod is not good enough and they need something more durable and stable. After making the first mistake, they suddenly realize that they need to do more research and they spend countless hours reading about tripods on different websites and forums. Despite all recommendations from the pros, they are not willing to invest on a top-of-the-line tripod with a good ball-head, so they end up getting a popular tripod system for $300-500 with a separate head. Seems like a great investment and the tripod seems to be much better than the previous one. After a year or two, they realize that their last purchase was not that good, because the tripod is too heavy and hard to use, especially for traveling. They realize that they should have listened to the pros in the beginning and bought a solid tripod system. Does this sound familiar? It certainly does for me, because I went through a similar experience and wasted too much effort and money.
Other photographers might have a different story, where they purchased an inexpensive tripod they like in the beginning and they are still happily using it today. All it says about them, is that they are not using their tripods as much and what they have is good enough for occasional use. Anybody who heavily relies on a tripod (especially landscape and architectural photographers) ends up buying two to three different tripods to eventually end up with the best.
It seems that it is hard to avoid purchasing multiple tripods, because it is often impossible to justify the cost of a good system to someone who does not heavily use a tripod. If someone told me that I would eventually spend more than $500 on a tripod system when I just got into photography, I would have never believed them – that’s too much money to spend on a darn tripod! But it all turned out to be true, because I actually ended up spending a lot more than $500 overtime, and I wish I could go back in time and buy the right stuff from the very beginning.
If I recommend someone who has just bought their first DSLR or a mirrorless camera to get the best tripod system that costs between $800 and $1,200, I will almost certainly get a “you are crazy” look, no matter how well I explain my story. Therefore, here is what I would recommend:
  • If you currently do not have a tripod and you want to buy one, get the cheapest aluminum tripod system with an integrated head for less than $150 total. Why do I recommend the cheapest tripod? Because you first need to understand how much you will be using it. Six months down the road you might end up doing other type of photography that does not require a tripod or you might find yourself on a path of becoming a good landscape or macro photographer. A cheap tripod will give you enough information to understand the real role of a tripod in your photography.
  • If you already have a cheap tripod and you want to get something better, save yourself a lot of money and frustration and get the best tripod with an arca-swiss quick release system – skip the middle. Some people buy cheaper legs and heads and either find them too heavy or unstable. One common problem with other quick-release systems, is the fact that cheaper plates do not grip well on cameras and start wiggling and rotating relative to the base, making it a nightmare for things like panoramic photography.
Original Post from : https://photographylife.com/how-to-choose-and-buy-a-tripod-for-a-dslr-camera

Shop Recommend Camera Tripod : 
Manbily - is a Low Price but good quality product , Hot sale in Amazon and Tmall China Market .  
Quality can become sirui but the price is OEM Price 

Sirui - Good Quality Tripod ,and the price Friendly with market 

Manfrotto - Branded Tripod , Good a Commerce and Photography Job . 

Thursday, 20 October 2016

We are create a new sales record for the Malaysia KLPF Fair in 2016 .up to new customer base in 200 new register user and increase a sale volume than 2015 .  Thank for customer support and we are promise will provide more good product and service in future

Our Brand in Booth : JJC , FUJITSU , PROOCAM





Sunday, 31 July 2016



The New PROOCAM 50cm X70cm Softbox Lighting & Studio Equipment Kit are available in Famcart Online Store now , Nice for setup mini studio , carry on and Save Cost setup for photo production . 

Some customer also use this lighting for video Film Marker , easy setting and Bulb you can custom buy other E27 mount Brand for fix in  . really nice and easy . 





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Saturday, 9 July 2016

From the Many customer request , when shooting the product no enough bright , no enough budget , no quality picture , than The Proocam EASYGO Light Tent provide you the easy carry and fast shooting system for your product shooting . Low Budget product shooting , Easy carry for studio . 

PROOCAM EASYGO is a portable, convenient and easy to setup photo mini studio that comes with bright LED bulbs It is designed for users who want to photograph small items that look great and appealing such as scaled models, cup cakes, jewellry etc. The LED light is powered via micro USB port using USB power adaptor or power bank, which are generally used to charge up smart phones nowadays. It is also durable and easy to store once folded properly. Now you can take product photos that look professional anytime and anywhere.

Feature
Small And Easy carry for travel
Magnetic structure. Simple assembly
Foldable design. Carry it anywhere.
All-in-one portable studio with Led Light (mini studio) easy to use.
Compatible with other digital camera device












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Friday, 1 July 2016


Record Full HD 1080p video with this Class 10 compliant 32GB Ultra UHS-I SDHC Memory Card from SanDisk. With enhanced data read speeds of up to 80 MB/s this Ultra SDHC memory card is designed to suit the needs of compact and mid-range point and shoot cameras. You can also save and store a variety of files such as music, movies, documents and more. The writable label found on the card allows you to write down what is saved to the card while the built-in write protect switch helps to prevent accidental data loss. This card, as with most SanDisk cards, comes shock, temperature, x-ray, magnet, and waterproof to take your files with you nearly anywhere you go.
 
- Class 10 performance for Full HD Video (1080p)
- Read speeds up to 80 MB/s
- Writable label for easy identification and organization
- Engineered with UHS-I bus architecture
- This SD memory card comes shock, temperature, x-ray, magnet, and waterproof proof
 
 
Specifications
 
 
Card Type  :SDHC
Storage Capacity  :32 GB
Speed Class :10
Bus Interface Speed  :UHS Class I
Data Transfer :Read Speed 80 MB/s Maximum
                :Write Speed 10 MB/s Minimum
Durability :Magnet-Proof, Shockproof, Temperature Extremes, Waterproof, X-Ray Proof
Insertion/Removal Cycles  :Not Specified By Manufacturer
Operating Temperature : -13 to 185°F/ -25 to 85°C
Storage Temperature : -40 to 185°F/ -40 to 85°C
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
JJC MCH Series Memory Card Holders features several individual slots to store your memory cards, which prevents your memory cards from dust and loss. Made of ABS, the holder is lightweight and portable. With compact design, the holder is credit card size. In addition, a hole is provided so you can attach the holder to your keychain. The holder keeps the card securely while allows you to store and remove it with your finger easily. There are memory card patterns on the back of the holder, ensuring that the memory cards are inserted rightly. What’s more, the patterns can be marked and noted in case that you mix your memory cards.
 
Product Highlights
- Several individual slots to store memory cards
- Prevents memory cards from dust and loss
- Credit card size, lightweight and portable
- With memory card patterns on the back for ease of use and can be marked
- A keychain hole is designed for easy carrying
- Memory cards can be inserted easily and rightly
 
Specifications
WeightNet  Weightg 14g
Gross Weightg 16.5g
 Full Size 85*57*4.8mm
SizePackagePackaging type Plastic bag
 Packing size 119*111*4.9mm
Material ABS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Package Including :
2 X Sandisk 32gb 80b/s
1 X JJC MCH-SD4GR Memory Card Holder
 
 
 
Product Code
13700067

Warranty Period 10 years
Warranty Type Manufacture

Product Visit: http://famcart.com.my/sandisk-32gb-48mb-2pack-jjc-memory-case.html

Thursday, 30 June 2016


Key Features :
Custom designed to fit Instax Mini 8 Cameras
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Protect your camera and other accessories from dust, scratches and damages
High Fashion and so cute for your camera        
 
note:
BAG ONLY. CAMERA JUST FOR REFERENCE ONLY.
 
Fit for 
FUJIFILM Intaxt MINI 8 ,7 Camera
 
 
 
 
 
 

Product Code
12700799
Warranty Period -
Warranty Type Manufacture

Product Visit: http://famcart.com.my/keep-design-instaxt-fujifilm-mini8-leather-bag-lightbrown.html

Key Features :
Custom designed to fit Instax Mini 8 Cameras
"Ever Ready" no need to take out the camera when taking photo
Protect your camera and other accessories from dust, scratches and damages
High Fashion and so cute for your camera        
 
note:
BAG ONLY. CAMERA JUST FOR REFERENCE ONLY.
 
Fit for 
FUJIFILM Intaxt MINI 8 ,7 Camera
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Product Code
12700800
Warranty Period -
Warranty Type Manufacture

Product Visit: http://famcart.com.my/keep-design-instaxt-fujifilm-mini8-leather-bag-brown.html

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